Childhood Apraxia of Speech

Learning as I go…

“It’s a funny thing, how much time we spend planning our lives. We so convince ourselves of what we want to do, that sometimes we don’t see what we’re meant to do.”
― Susan Gregg GilmoreLooking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen

I had plans for my career and I still have plans, but my currently my priority is making sure my 2 kids receive the support, care and therapy they need. I do my best to educate myself about their condition, Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  I read books, blogs, visit CASANA’s website, attend workshops, follow others with Apraxia on Facebook.  At this time in my life, this is what I was meant to do.

So I’d like to share with you some tricks and helpful hints, I’ve learned on this journey with Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

First, become an advocate for your child’s condition.  It is important to educate others about the condition, so this means educating yourself.  I would suggest visiting CASANA’s website. http://www.apraxia-kids.org   This website is an excellent resource and I use it to help me answer many of the questions I and others have about Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

Facebook has been an excellent resource. I follow these pages, Mikey’s Wish – Verbal Dyspraxia AwarenessSLP mommy of Apraxia/DyspraxiaChildhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA), APRAXIA-KIDS-Every Child deserves a voice group and my local Apraxia-Kids Pennsylvania Group.  These pages have become an excellent resource for support and education about Apraxia.  I am able to connect with other parents and share our stories.  Facebook is also a great way to share information about Apraxia.  I use Facebook as a communication tool to update family and friends on my kids’ progress.  Facebook provides me an excellent outlet and links me to a community.
Books are also an excellent resource.  These are two books I have enjoyed reading:
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In our home I do my best to organize our speech resources.  I save homework lessons, word cards and other items our therapists provided for at home practice.  I have intended to keep notebooks for each child to document their therapy sessions and what they have learned and worked on, however, my iPhone is an excellent source for note taking.  Most importantly, I have made each child a binder.  In these binders I keep all of important papers we have received on our journey.  Paperwork from Early Intervention, IEPs, summaries of therapy sessions, diagnosis papers, calendars, and any other paperwork I feel is important to save.
I have returned to these binders a number of times.  I pull paperwork when I have progress meetings.  This paperwork is also extremely important when I work with our school district.

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Collection of paperwork since Maya began therapy

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Childhood Apraxia of Speech

Update on the Kids

Our household is very busy.  With two kids in speech therapy, we spend a lot of time going to different appointments.   I am extremely grateful we can provide so much care, support and therapy for our children.  This crazy busy life works for us and most importantly it works for our kids.

Currently, CJ receives therapy twice a week.  He receives therapy from a private speech therapist and he receives speech therapy within our home through an Early Intervention speech therapist. Both of these therapist have worked with Maya and they are very knowledgable in the treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  More importantly, I have wonderful relationships with CJ’s therapist.  They provide Kevin and I with homework and tools to use in our home to help further CJ’s speech.  In a short period of time, CJ’s language has grown.  He makes many verbal attempts to express his wants and needs.  This growth would not have been possible without his two speech therapist.

(We intend on increasing CJ’s weekly speech therapy sessions when he turns 3.)

 

 

Currently, we take a more aggressive approach to Maya’s therapy sessions. At the age of 3.5, we decided to increase Maya’s weekly therapy sessions. Fundraising and insurance has played a significant role in helping us increase her therapy sessions. During the week, Maya will receive 4 speech therapy sessions and 1 occupational therapy session. (She has therapy with 2 private therapist, 1 private OT, and a therapist provided through our school district). Overloading Maya with therapy sessions has significantly helped improve her expressive language.  Like her brother, we also incorporate practice sessions at home.

Here is a video of Maya and me practicing the “K” sound in the final position of a word.

(You will see I provide Maya with small toys or play-doh to play with during our practice sessions.  She has a difficult time focusing and toys help by keeping her seated during our practice session.)

 

 

 

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